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This is a view of Revolutionary War general William Winds' original home (center of the picture) in New Jersey from present-day Cooper Road. Historians have been able to place Winds in the area in his early twenties sometime in the late 1740s or…

This is a photograph taken by J. Percy Crayon from an area of Denville formerly known as Pigeon Hill. It was taken outside of William Winds' original home in New Jersey. Historians have been able to place Winds in the area in his early twenties…

This is Revolutionary War general William Winds' original home in New Jersey. Historians have been able to place Winds in the area in his early twenties sometime in the late 1740s or early 1750s. The general later moved to present-day Randolph…

The Memorial Stone resting on top of William Winds grave in the graveyard at the First Presbyterian Church in Rockaway, NJ. Worn due to weathering, the text was preserved in 1958 by Kensley Robert Thompson as a black wax rubbing which is on display…

The Proprietary House served as the royal governor's home from 1764 through 1776. It was constructed by architect John Edward Pryor and first served as the home to Royal Governor Chief Justice Smyth. It was also the home of the last royal governor,…

This is a letter written by Brigadier General William Winds to Major General Philemon Dickinson during the final stages of preparation for the Battle of Monmouth during the American Revolution.

This is a response to General Winds' letter to Major General Philemon Dickinson of which Washington was sent a copy. Washington requests that Winds joins him near Middletown where the Battle of Monmouth would take place the following day.

This document is included in Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, Series 1. Vol. VII. 1853-1855. The biography was read by Tuttle in front of the New Jersey Historical Society on May 19, 1853. The author painted a very complex image of…

This is the last will and testament from General William Winds. Winds was a soldier, judge, and Patriot. He was born on Long Island, but moved to Morris County, New Jersey sometime in his twenties. He bought a tract of land in present-day Denville…

This is a sketch of Rockaway from the Morris Canal in 1844. To the right is the First Presbyterian Church of Rockaway which was founded in 1752. The church's construction was funded by notable New Jerseyans including William Winds, a Revolutionary…

This is a portrait of the last royal governor of New Jersey - William Franklin. Franklin was the illegitimate son of Benjamin Franklin, but was a steadfast Loyalist until the conclusion of the American Revolution.

In January 1776, Governor…

The Proprietary House served as the royal governor's home from 1764 through 1776. It was constructed by architect John Edward Pryor and first served as the home to Royal Governor Chief Justice Smyth. It was also the home of the last royal governor,…

This is a newspaper announcement of the Stamp Act of 1765 which circulated around the colonies before the Revolution.

This is the grave site of William Winds. Winds served the British Royal Army in the French and Indian War and took up the Patriots' cause in the American Revolution. He also served as a judge between wars and founded the First Presbyterian Church…

This is Revolutionary War general William Winds' original home in New Jersey. Historians have been able to place Winds in the area in his early twenties sometime in the late 1740s or early 1750s. The general later moved to present-day Randolph…

This Georgian style home built in the early 1770s in Morristown was owned by Jacob Ford Jr., an American Revolutionary militia officer. After his death, his widow, Theodosia, gave permission for George Washington to use the home as his headquarters…

Built by the mayor of “Elizabethtown” in 1750, Boxwood Hall was home to patriot and lawyer Elias Boudinot. On the way to New York City for his inauguration in 1789, President-elect George Washington stopped at the house. Other notable visitors…

This letter and general orders were written at the Van Allen House when George Washington and his army stayed there on July 14-15, 1777. These were written by George Washington.

The first one is a letter from Washington to the president of the…

This is a small example of one of the methods colonial girls were taught their ABCs. Colonial girls would take a piece of cloth and cross-stitch letters into it. This was a sort-of alphabet book. Girls were not expected to go to school and, given…

This photo shows what the inside of a Colonial Era wall looked like. The wall was made with clay, straw and rough Blaster backed together with horse hair or pig bristle. It was then finished with plaster that was made from local lime stone with…

The Battle of Monmouth occurred on June 28, 1778. Washington's troops stood their ground against Redcoats under the guidance of Lieutenant General Sir Henry Clinton.

In the end, there was no clear victor, but it proved the growth of the…

The Memorial Stone resting on top of William Winds grave in the graveyard at the First Presbyterian Church in Rockaway, NJ. Worn due to weathering, the text was preserved in 1958 by Kensley Robert Thompson as a black wax rubbing which is on display…

The Ho-Ho-Kus Inn was originally owned by J.J. Zabriskie. Historians believe portions of the building were constructed before the Revolutionary War. The Inn has been open since 1790 as a bed and breakfast and is currently a five-star restaurant. …

This is a picture of a bullet pouch used by military infantrymen in the 1770s. This particularly one is called a Shoulder Cartridge Box. The pouch itself would rest on the soldier’s right side. It contained twenty to thirty bullets and other…

This is a picture of a canteen from the 1770s. This particularly canteen is made of tin, and both the American and British military infantrymen had this during the time period. However, the tin canteens became rare because the British were…

This is an image of the Colt family coat of arms. It pictures three colts running, with Peter Colt's name at the bottom and the phrase "vincit qui patitur." Translated: "he who conquers endures"
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