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The Memorial Stone resting on top of William Winds grave in the graveyard at the First Presbyterian Church in Rockaway, NJ. Worn due to weathering, the text was preserved in 1958 by Kensley Robert Thompson as a black wax rubbing which is on display…

Picture of Gus Ohberg, a business man from Highland Lakes (Vernon), NJ, and the Mastodon skull found on his property while having his pond dredged for expansion. The full skeleton was exhumed from the pond and an extra bone.

This is a letter written by Brigadier General William Winds to Major General Philemon Dickinson during the final stages of preparation for the Battle of Monmouth during the American Revolution.

This is a response to General Winds' letter to Major General Philemon Dickinson of which Washington was sent a copy. Washington requests that Winds joins him near Middletown where the Battle of Monmouth would take place the following day.

This document is included in Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, Series 1. Vol. VII. 1853-1855. The biography was read by Tuttle in front of the New Jersey Historical Society on May 19, 1853. The author painted a very complex image of…

Joseph Percy Crain (or Crane) was born in 1841, although it is uncertain where he was born. He moved to northern New Jersey at an early age and became a schoolteacher in the town of Rockaway (now - Denville) where he changed his last name to Crayon.…

This is the last will and testament from General William Winds. Winds was a soldier, judge, and Patriot. He was born on Long Island, but moved to Morris County, New Jersey sometime in his twenties. He bought a tract of land in present-day Denville…

This is a portrait of the last royal governor of New Jersey - William Franklin. Franklin was the illegitimate son of Benjamin Franklin, but was a steadfast Loyalist until the conclusion of the American Revolution.

In January 1776, Governor…

J. Percy Crayon was a schoolteacher and amateur historian from present-day Denville, New Jersey. In the late 19th century, he compiled a record of all the major founding families of Morris County. The book includes many important families,…

This is the grave site of William Winds. Winds served the British Royal Army in the French and Indian War and took up the Patriots' cause in the American Revolution. He also served as a judge between wars and founded the First Presbyterian Church…

By the spring of 1899, Vice President Garret Hobart was ill with cardiac illness. He needed to recuperate and so he retreated to his birthplace at the shore in Long Branch. There he was visited by President William McKinley. Hobart succumbed to heart…

This letter and general orders were written at the Van Allen House when George Washington and his army stayed there on July 14-15, 1777. These were written by George Washington.

The first one is a letter from Washington to the president of the…

These five photos show the Van Allen House as it was in the early 20th century when it was called Vygeberg Farm, or Page Farm. The farm was owned by Edward Day Page who used it to make dairy products.

On the top left and top right are pictures…

This picture shows the tools and the house that once belonged to Jno Mandigo, a blacksmith and farmer who lived in Oakland from 1822 to 1894. His home was at 266 Ramapo Valley Road. Jno was one of four blacksmiths who had a shop on Ramapo Valley…

This is a news article that appeared on February 6, 1974 in the Suburban News that discusses the plan to renovate the Van Allen House. Along with the article is a medal commemorating the Oakland Historical Society's President at that time, Roy…

This is the wedding photo of Mary Post Van Houten and Henry B. Demarest. The picture was taken in Paterson, New Jersey. This is one of the earliest examples of photography. The technique used at the time was called Daguerreotype, named after…

This painting shows the Lauzon Legion with the Rhode Island Regiment on Route 202 and Franklin Avenue in Oakland, New Jersey on August 25, 1781. Their job was to guard George Washington's 2nd Division as they traveled from Hudson South to Yorktown,…

This typewriter belonged to Sidney Kingsley, a dramatist. Some of the plays he wrote include "Dead End," "Detective Story," "Men in White," and others. His first Broadway play, "Men in White," won him a Pulitzer. He and his wife, actress Madge…

This 40 Cal. Double Barreled Derringer was found by Thomas McCaffrey on his bungalow on Bailey Ave, in Oakland, New Jersey. This gun comes from the 1840s and is hand-made with parts unique to the gun. It was never mass-produced. The term derringer…

These three pictures show an inquisition document made in Bergen County, New Jersey on January 13th, 1779. The document talks about a case against a John Demot (Demott) who joined the British Army in 1776 or 1777, and was found guilty. The paper…

Here is a picture of Henry R. Hopper: Oakland’s last blacksmith, and a picture of his tools with a smaller picture of himself in the center of the piece of wood that holds the tools. His father and two older brothers were also blacksmiths, so…

The Battle of Monmouth occurred on June 28, 1778. Washington's troops stood their ground against Redcoats under the guidance of Lieutenant General Sir Henry Clinton.

In the end, there was no clear victor, but it proved the growth of the…

This is a picture of the portrait of Harry Gale McNomee with his mother, Cora L. McNomee. Harry was born in 1883, so the portrait was made when he was one year old. Mr. McNomee’s biggest contribution to the town of Oakland was in the role of fire…

The Memorial Stone resting on top of William Winds grave in the graveyard at the First Presbyterian Church in Rockaway, NJ. Worn due to weathering, the text was preserved in 1958 by Kensley Robert Thompson as a black wax rubbing which is on display…

This is a picture of a bullet pouch used by military infantrymen in the 1770s. This particularly one is called a Shoulder Cartridge Box. The pouch itself would rest on the soldier’s right side. It contained twenty to thirty bullets and other…

This is a picture of a canteen from the 1770s. This particularly canteen is made of tin, and both the American and British military infantrymen had this during the time period. However, the tin canteens became rare because the British were…

Having served as President of Princeton University and Governor of New Jersey, Woodrow Wilson was President-elect of the United States when he was in Trenton on December 21, 1912. William Jennings Bryan, unsuccessful three times before in his own…

Theodore Roosevelt was campaigning in Hackensack on May 23, 1912 as a Progressive “Bull Moose” candidate. Two days later, President William Taft would pass through the same town. Hackensack was not Roosevelt's only campaign stop that day. He…

Born on October 15, 1847 in New York City, NY Ralph Blakelock belonged to an affluent family, as his father was a successful physician. In 1864, Blakelock began his studies in art at the Free Academy of the City of New York. After his third term,…

Mastodon Head. Jaw being assembled in the Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

This is a portrait of Roswell L. Colt, son of Peter Colt. He was known as "the greatest of all colts." He was the Governor of the S.U.M. from 1814-1850.

This is an image of Alexander Hamilton in front of the S.U.M. building at the Great Falls, overlooking the hydroelectric plant.

The Paterson Silk Workers strike took place in 1913. Many of those who participated in the strike were arrested, possibly as many as 1,850 people. The City of Paterson experienced many strikes between the years of 1990 until 1913. This included…

This image depicts a group of Hungarian miners presumably drinking after work. The workers are depicted with a keg and bottles in hand.

This photo is of strike leaders involved in the Paterson Silk Strike of 1913. In this picture are Patrick Quinlan, Carlo Tresca, Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, Adolph Lessig, and Bill Haywood. This strike halted work in Paterson's silk factories. Worker…

Workers at Paterson silk factory. Paterson became known by the name Silk City because is was thriving, due to silk production and other factors. Workers came from all over to find work in Paterson until a rise in unions occurred.

This is a picture of a newspaper clipping found in a scrapbook from 1916 from Newark NJ. It shows the Calvary returning home. This photograph shows solders being processed out of the military.

Photograph of unidentified group of men laying a wreath laying at an unidentified grave site in Woodstown, New Jersey. It may be the gravestone of Major Christian Piercy who died September 27, 1793 and located on a farm called Frank Horner's Farm.…

Historically, baseball in the United States can be traced back to the 18th Century. It began when amateur player played a game very similar to baseball with rules that they made up and makeshift equipment. The sports became so popular that it…

1930's, radio announcer Norman Brokenshire, an unidentified woman, Atlantic City Pageant director Armand Nicholls, an unidentified man, Miss America 1933 Marion Bergeron, Enoch "Nucky Johnson, Joseph Kennedy Sr., and Red Skelton.

A Portrait of Atlantic City's main boss, Enoch "Nucky" Johnson, during the Prohibition era.

Alexander Hamilton formed an investment group called the Society of Useful Manufacturers. Funds from this group were used to develop a planned industrial city in the United States, Paterson, New Jersey. Hamilton believed that the United States needed…

Captain John Weller of Paterson, NJ attempted to cross the Atlantic in a 50-foot motor boat in July 1911. The boat had a 12-foot high beam and Weller believed it was strong enough to withstand the voyage.
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