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The Proprietary House served as the royal governor's home from 1764 through 1776. It was constructed by architect John Edward Pryor and first served as the home to Royal Governor Chief Justice Smyth. It was also the home of the last royal governor,…

This document is included in Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, Series 1. Vol. VII. 1853-1855. The biography was read by Tuttle in front of the New Jersey Historical Society on May 19, 1853. The author painted a very complex image of…

This is a portrait of the last royal governor of New Jersey - William Franklin. Franklin was the illegitimate son of Benjamin Franklin, but was a steadfast Loyalist until the conclusion of the American Revolution.

In January 1776, Governor…

The Proprietary House served as the royal governor's home from 1764 through 1776. It was constructed by architect John Edward Pryor and first served as the home to Royal Governor Chief Justice Smyth. It was also the home of the last royal governor,…

This is a newspaper announcement of the Stamp Act of 1765 which circulated around the colonies before the Revolution.

When the Senate rejected the Versailles Treaty in 1919, the United States technically remained at war. On July 2, 1921 President Warren G. Harding signed a separate peace with Germany. The treaty was signed by Harding at the estate of Joseph S.…

Created by Gutzon Borglum, the same artist and sculptor as Mount Rushmore, “Seated Lincoln” is a sculpture made of bronze. The piece shows Abraham Lincoln seated on a bench. Abraham Lincoln passed through Newark on February 21, 1861 en route to…

The last existing piece from the U.S.S. Princeton hangs from a wooden frame in front of the Princeton Borough Hall. On February 28, 1844 President John Tyler and other dignitaries were onboard while the ship was sailing on the Potomac River in…

Designed by Frederick MacMonnies and made from stone, this monument is located on park property at the intersection of Stockton Street and Bayard Street. Commemorating the Battle of Princeton on January 3, 1777, it depicts George Washington on his…

By the spring of 1899, Vice President Garret Hobart was ill with cardiac illness. He needed to recuperate and so he retreated to his birthplace at the shore in Long Branch. There he was visited by President William McKinley. Hobart succumbed to heart…

The 22nd and 24th President was born on March 18, 1837 in a modest construction of Federal and Greek architecture. Built in 1832, the house was the residence of a local Presbyterian minister. The Cleveland family resided in the home for nearly a…

Built by the mayor of “Elizabethtown” in 1750, Boxwood Hall was home to patriot and lawyer Elias Boudinot. On the way to New York City for his inauguration in 1789, President-elect George Washington stopped at the house. Other notable visitors…

Having served as President of Princeton University and Governor of New Jersey, Woodrow Wilson was President-elect of the United States when he was in Trenton on December 21, 1912. William Jennings Bryan, unsuccessful three times before in his own…

Theodore Roosevelt was campaigning in Hackensack on May 23, 1912 as a Progressive “Bull Moose” candidate. Two days later, President William Taft would pass through the same town. Hackensack was not Roosevelt's only campaign stop that day. He…

Grover Cleveland, the only United States President to hold office for two non-consecutive terms, is buried at Princeton Cemetery along with his wife Frances Folsom Cleveland. Ruth Cleveland, eldest of their five children, died of diphtheria at age…

Cedar Lawn Cemetery in Paterson is the final resting place of Garret Hobart, Vice President of the United States under William McKinley. The Grecian Doric style mausoleum was created by architect Henry Bacon Jr. 1866-1924 who is responsible for…

This is a death certificate of Albert Mersier who died during the Newark riots.

This is the old Engine #1 firehouse located at 112 Van Houten Street, Paterson. It is currently used as the workshop for Greenbaum Interiors, a furniture store on the next corner at Washington Street.

This is an image of the estate of Peter Colt, Revolutionary War veteran and co-founder of the City of Paterson. After his death, Peter Colt's residence was used as the first City Hall until 1902, and Police Headquarters until 1980.

A Portrait of Atlantic City's main boss, Enoch "Nucky" Johnson, during the Prohibition era.

Title: Politics and Politicians

Article Text: The views expressed by this writer are strictly the personal opinion of the author and do not represent the Editorial status of this newspaper.

In spite of the fact that some rather large-sized…

Title: Enoch L. Johnson Named As Republican Leader

Subtitle: Former Supreme Court Clerk, Now County Collector, Selected by Party Rank and File to Direct Destinies of Grand Old Party in Important Elections Affecting County, State and…

Title: Atlantic City Man Who Looted Patroni Cellar Given Sentenced of Five to Ten Years by Judge Smathers

Article Text: Convicted by a jury before Judge Smathers at Mays Landing on Monday, John J. Childs, colored, 402 North Ohio Avenue, Atlantic…

Title: Atlantic City Inspires Confidence

Article Text: At no time in the history of Atlantic City could be enumerated so many improvements as today. Every road leading to the World’s Playground has been improved and additional new highways are…

Title: Edge In Straightforward Statement Clarifies Rum Treaty, Walloping Foes

Subtitle/Disclosure: In No Uncertain Words the New Jersey Senator Makes a Clear Honest Statement of His Stand, Showing That The Agreement with Great Britain Slaps the…

Title: War Declared On Shore Liquor Law, Violators By Dr. Marna S. Poulson

Subtitle: New Head of Anti-Saloon League of New Jersey Will Devote Special Attention to “Beating Rotten Bunch in Atlantic City,” He Declares

Article Text: Atlantic…
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