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A Letter From Brigadier General William Winds to Major General Philemon Dickinson

Dublin Core

Title

A Letter From Brigadier General William Winds to Major General Philemon Dickinson

Description

This is a letter written by Brigadier General William Winds to Major General Philemon Dickinson during the final stages of preparation for the Battle of Monmouth during the American Revolution.

Creator

Winds, William

Date

1778-06-26

Contributor

Ward, Christopher

Rights

The George Washington Papers are available rights free from the Digital Library of Congress.

Format

GIF

Language

English

Type

Text

Coverage

1770s
Monmouth County
American Revolution

Scripto

Transcription

New Brunswick June 26th 1778
7 oClock PM

Dear General
I this Day Informed you of My being here with about 800 Men, With Whom I Intended to Advance tomorrow Morning, but Afterwards Concluded to take the Cool of the Evening to Go on as far as Spotswood, & Accordingly put the body In Motion & Went on about two Miles, When I learnt the Bridges at Spotswood & South River were Cut Down & that I Could not Gain Freehold by any rout Short of 9 or 10 Miles more than if the Spotswood bridge had been Standing, Which Affording so little prospect of Coming up with the Enemy that I returned to this place, & Shall now return with all speed to My post, The Disappointment Gives me real Concern but When I Consider the situation of the lines under My Charge & that I have not the least Prospect Remaining, of Rendering the Smallest service by Advancing, I Cannot but think My present Measure will Meet your Approbation.

Your Most Humb Servt
Wm Winds

Document Item Type Metadata

Text

I this Day Informed you of My being here with about 800 Men, With Whom I Intended to Advance tomorrow Morning, but Afterwards Concluded to take the Cool of the Evening to Go on as far as Spotswood, & Accordingly put the body In Motion & Went on about two Miles, When I learnt the Bridges at Spotswood & South River were Cut Down & that I Could not Gain Freehold by any rout Short of 9 or 10 Miles more than if the Spotswood bridge had been Standing, Which Affording so little prospect of Coming up with the Enemy that I returned to this place, & Shall now return with all speed to My post, The Disappointment Gives me real Concern but When I Consider the situation of the lines under My Charge & that I have not the least Prospect Remaining, of Rendering the Smallest service by Advancing, I Cannot but think My present Measure will Meet your Approbation.

Original Format

paper

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